Monthly Archives: February 2015

Ice Lighthouse

Preserved 1950s Kitchen, Exactly As It Was Built

It’s a stunning time capsule that owner Nathan Chandler never expected to find. He’s a furniture designer who purchased a house in 2010. The original owners had the place built and furnished. But for unknown reasons,* they never lived there. The kitchen has everything that a middle class American family in the 1950s could want. It’s like stepping into a set from Mad Men.

The original appliances sit unused. Even the original product manuals are there.

Anniversary of the final episode of M*A*S*H

M*A*S*H

The series premiered on September 17, 1972, and ended on February 28, 1983, with the finale becoming the most-watched television episode in U.S. television history at the time.

“Goodbye, Farewell and Amen” was the final episode of M*A*S*H. Special television sets were placed in PX parking lots, auditoriums, and dayrooms of the US Army in Korea so that military personnel could watch that episode; this in spite of 14 hours’ time zone difference with the east coast of the US. The episode aired on February 28, 1983, and was 2½ hours long.

Wikipedia Link

RIP Leonard Nimoy

Leonard Simon Nimoy ( March 26, 1931 – February 27, 2015)

Leonard Simon Nimoy ( March 26, 1931 – February 27, 2015)

Blatently borrowed from Wikipedia:

Leonard Nimoy was an American actor, film director, poet, singer and photographer. Nimoy was best known for his role as Spock in the original Star Trek series (1966–69), and in multiple film, television and video game sequels.

Nimoy was born to Jewish migrant parents in Boston, Massachusetts. He began his career in his early twenties, teaching acting classes in Hollywood and making minor film and television appearances through the 1950s, as well as playing the title role in Kid Monk Baroni. Foreshadowing his fame as a semi-alien, he played Narab, one of three Martian invaders in the 1952 movie serial Zombies of the Stratosphere. In 1953, he served in the United States Army.

In 1965, he made his first appearance in the rejected Star Trek pilot The Cage, and went on to play the character of Mr. Spock until 1969, followed by eight feature films and guest slots in the various spin-off series. The character has had a significant cultural impact and garnered Nimoy three Emmy Award nominations; TV Guide named Spock one of the 50 greatest TV characters. After the original Star Trek series, Nimoy starred in Mission: Impossible for two seasons, hosted the documentary series In Search of…, and narrated Civilization IV, as well as making several well-received stage appearances. More recently, he also had a recurring role in the science fiction series Fringe.

Nimoy’s fame as Spock was such that both of his autobiographies, I Am Not Spock (1975) and I Am Spock (1995), were written from the viewpoint of sharing his existence with the character.
Death

In February 2014, Nimoy revealed that he had been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). On Twitter, he said: “I quit smoking 30 yrs ago. Not soon enough. I have COPD. Grandpa says, quit now!! LLAP (Live Long and Prosper).” On February 19, 2015, Nimoy was rushed to UCLA Medical Center for severe chest pains after a call to 911. According to accounts, he had been in and out of hospitals for the “past several months.”

Nimoy died on February 27, 2015 in his Bel Air home from final complications of COPD, according to his wife Susan. He was 83 years old, and is survived by Susan and his two children and six grandchildren from his first marriage.

A few days before his passing, Nimoy shared some of his poetry on social media website Twitter. The final tweet that he sent out read: “A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP”.

Shatner said of his friend “I loved him like a brother […] We will all miss his humor, his talent, and his capacity to love.”

Zachary Quinto, who portrayed the younger “Spock” character in films Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness, commented on Nimoy’s death: “my heart is broken. i love you profoundly my dear friend. and i will miss you everyday. may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.”

George Takei stated: “The word extraordinary is often overused, but I think it’s really appropriate for Leonard. He was an extraordinarily talented man, but he was also a very decent human being. His talent embraced directing as well as acting and photography. He was a very sensitive man. And we feel his passing very much. He had been ill for a long, long time, and we miss him very much.”

Leonard Nimoy as Spock

 

Real Unicorns

Real Unicorns

Happy Birthday, Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash (February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003)

Johnny Cash, born J. R. Cash, was a Grammy Award-winning American country singer-songwriter. Cash is widely considered to be one of the most influential American musicians of the 20th century.

Cash was known for his deep, distinctive voice, the boom-chick-a-boom or “freight train” sound of his Tennessee Three backing band, his demeanor, and his dark clothing, which earned him the nickname “The Man in Black”. He traditionally started his concerts with the simple introduction “Hello, I’m Johnny Cash.”

He sold over 90 million albums in his nearly fifty-year career and came to occupy a “commanding position in music history”.

Wikipedia Link

The Littlest Nope

Nope, not gonna do it!

Nope, not gonna do it!

Tree Line

Tree Line

3d Glasses

3d Glasses

RIP Chuck Jones

Charles Martin “Chuck” Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Brothers cartoon studio.

In 1966, he produced and directed the TV special How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

He directed the Rudyard Kipling book adaptation of “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi“, which was released on January 9, 1975.

Root Beer

Root Beer

RIP Gary Owens

Gary Owens (May 10, 1934 – February 12, 2015)

Gary Owens (May 10, 1934 – February 12, 2015)

Gary Owens (born Gary Bernard Altman) was an American disc jockey and voice actor. His polished baritone speaking voice generally offered deadpan recitations of total nonsense, which he frequently demonstrated as the announcer on Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In. Owens was equally proficient in straight or silly assignments and was frequently heard on television, radio and in commercials.

He was best known, aside from being the announcer on Laugh-In, for providing the voice of the titular superhero on Space Ghost.

Owens provided the voices for:

Wikipedia Link

Social Networking

Social Networking

Whome?

Whome?

Whom

Whom

Upside Down

Upside Down

 

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Assault Plunger

... for when shit hits the fan!

… for when shit hits the fan!

History of the Conversation Heart

Conversation Hearts

Valentine’s Day means chalky candy hearts with a lot to say. But what’s behind these very loud little candies?

The story of conversation hearts began in 1847, when a Boston pharmacist named Oliver Chase longed for a way to get in on the apothecary lozenge craze. Lozenges were quickly gaining steam as the medicine conveyance of choice, and were also popular remedies for sore throats and bad breath. But making lozenges was complicated and time-consuming—the process involved a mortar and pestle, kneading dough, rolling it out, and cutting it into discs that would eventually become lozenges.

There had to be a better way, and Oliver came up with it. Inspired by the new wave of gadgets and tools that hit America as it industrialized, he invented a machine that rolled lozenge dough and pressed wafers into perfect discs. Oliver had inadvertently created America’s first candy-making machine, and before long, he had abandoned his pharmacy business to crank out miles of what would become New England Confectionery Company (NECCO) wafers.

Legend has it that Oliver’s NECCO wafers were carried by Civil War soldiers, and some speculate that the tradition of sending loving greetings to the troops morphed into the conversation heart, but those claims are hard to verify. What is clear is that as Oliver built his candy empire, his brother Daniel decided he wanted a piece of the action.

Inspired by the growing market for Valentine’s cards (which were popularized in the United States by Esther Howland, also a resident of Boston at the time), Daniel wondered if it would be possible to print sentimental messages on candy. In 1866, he figured out a way to print words on candy with vegetable dye during the cutting process.

People loved conversation candies (they weren’t available in heart shapes until 1902) and their witty messages, which could stoke the flames of love or warn off flaky suitors. Daniel’s candies were bigger than today’s version and had phrases like “MARRIED IN WHITE YOU HAVE CHOSEN RIGHT” and “HOW LONG SHALL I HAVE TO WAIT? PLEASE BE CONSIDERATE” emblazoned on a pastel, scalloped wafer.

Back in my day…

Back in my day, we had 9 planets…

Happy Valentine’s Day

Happy Valentines Day